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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)
is to defeat the republicans in the midterm election, to just run on politics, tactically maneuver, defeat republicans, don't worry about the nation, and do what he wants to do in the final two years? >> i am for striking deals, if you watch that movie, lincoln, you're for striking deals -- i'm for cutting deals, but i'm not just for saying everybody should come together because here i am. >> but last night -- >> when you say be ruthless, if a republican, if a tea party member said be ruthless people would be screaming at you. >> what i think he should do -- >> anderson says -- >> well, i wasn't quoting, i was -- >> i'm sure i did use that word. that means it's not just saying come let's reason together. give them something, and then take something. do the grimy realistic -- sometimes unpleasant work of running the country. >> and this is the magic that the movie "lincoln" illustrated. the passage of the 13th amendment happened in a far more polarized congress than the current congress we have. if they can do anything -- president obama is not going to have a major legacy piece in terms of
. and it was a pure ideological election. because there were no personalities involved. you weren't voting for president. you want boating up and down on a figure. you were voting on issues and the dominant issue was obama and as a scare, the stimulus committee increase in spending, the expansion of the government. or to put it in a more abstract and grand was the difference between federal and state which was tilting more toward state. when the question is put that way, the country shows itself to be center-right country. had republicans been able to duplicate those conditions, that framework in 2012, they would have won. but it is not the same election. 2010 is almost purely ideological election. perhaps the most ideological since 1980. then you get to 2010, when you have a personality involved and you have a figure represents one side. romney is a good man. i like him. i think he is an honorable man, and i think he would have made an excellent president. but he was a bad candidate particularly in an election that could have been one had been an election about ideas and philosophy. i thi
2012 election cycle. it's an opportunity to kind of reflect on american history and create a sense of unity. the most raccus was andrew jackson. when he got to the white house they were serving cider and people trashed the place. he slipped out the back of the executive mansion as it was called then and fled to alexandria and went to a tavern. he's tapped to be president. he took a barge to new york city and is sworn in. it's wrought with tradition. this is a time for the people to be glad that democracy works. the whole world is watching now. >> the longest inaugural was william henry harrison. >> he gave this long winded speech and got will. it was freezing weather. he died only a month later from his own inaugural. you don't want to be ranked below william henry harrison. >> what are you looking for tomorrow? >> most important is to have some kind of healing message. this is not a state of the union address. this is the president carefully reading lincoln's second inaugural, the poetry and language of it. i do think that barack obama, since the first one was historic for him, he
election. that is not unusual. when you consider that half of them probably married voters and that romney won married voters by 54%, wouldn't it be advisable for us, in addition to fine tuning our message and in addition to focusing on having a better competition for candidates, wouldn't it be better for us to focus on bringing out our voters? they are out there. married women, married men, tend to vote republican. >> i want to answer that. in addition to registering people, people who follow me on twitter know i watch way too much msnbc. sometimes i get the impression that people are not looking at what the other side is doing. it wasn't just voter registration. there was also convincing people that republicans were suppressing the black and other minority vote. i think there was a total lack of realization on the right that this is going on. the left truly believes and convinces -- it uses the strategy that republicans are trying to suppress the vote. when we don't -- we don't even pay attention to what the other side is doing. how the heck are we going -- >> at the national level, i di
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
was in that referendum was very much part of his manifesto of the last election. [shouting] >> in the interest of harmony i think we'll leave that to one side. >> mr. speaker, a constituent of mine with a chronic medical condition tells me that he is just 20 pounds a week to spend on food and clothing after paying his utility bills, and after april after the welfare cuts in april, he will just have to pounds a day. if the prime minister police we're all in it together, with the agreed to review the impact on the very poorest of the welfare cuts so that my constituents sacrifices are in line with his own? >> i will look very close to what the honorable gentleman says and the circumstances. let me just make the point, if you compare 2013 with 2010 in terms of the level of key benefits, it is worth making this point. and unemployed person on jobseeker's allowance is getting 325 pounds more this year than in 2010. a couple jobseeker's allowance, 500 pounds more. a single out of work mother, 420 pounds more to do with the opposition try and do, week after week, is somehow paint a picture that we have unfairly
, you know, president obama is now won election twice with over 5%, 50% of the vote, which is, you know, he is, he and joe biden, those only two offices everybody votes for. and he has won. he got over 50%. so he will make his case. i think what is different, what is significantly different, there will be confrontation but i think the first time you're seeing the president move hess campaign organization, we just saw this in the last few days, move it into advocacy on the issues for his agenda during the second term. that's unprecedented. no president's ever been able it do that. and this time it is not with some rinky-dink campaign organization that we've seen in the past. this is the biggest campaign organization ever seen in the united states. 28, 30 million people. those people making the case to their members of congress regardless of party, whether the member is democrat or republican. i think could change the way we look at a lame duck second term presidency because of the power of that grassroots organization. bill: wow! that's a big statement, joe. back to the initial question
. and scott walker, he survived i recall election over the summer. quite the panel. thank you, all, for joining me this morning. do you sense, since are you all more or less outside washington, that there is a split between how governors, mayors, folks that have particular causes look at republicans in washington and how they look at the republican party? >> no doubt about it. and there is a lot of pessimism, unfortunately. a lot of republican conservatives in the nation's capitol. you get around the country. bob and i like to make this point a lot. even though the president won re-election, there are 30 states with republican governors. we look at tax reform. happened at the state level and local level. governors and mayors really put forward the cause. we need to change the climate in washington, we are changing it every day in the statehouse. >> sure, but at the same time i can look around the table and say you won, first governor ever to win a recall bid. or a recall call, and you were in a very conservative state in a conservative spot. you are in a conservative state. so you
republicans of that he pointed to the last election, miguel, where republican mitt romney got just 26% of the latino vote, 71% backed president obama. and those are numbers that stand out to the gop. >> oh, the numbers, yes, i'm sure they do no mystery why the president is in nevada, certainly want to paint that state blue as well what is your sense of it, can -- will congress come together in the math has changed enor mousily on immigration politics. ly be able to get his reforms through congress? >> reporter: we are hearing more optimism from both sides of congress today on the sunday talk shows than perhaps people have heard in a while and perhaps one reason, miguel, could be taking a look at the poll numbers. when you have a cnn/orc poll that was taken just a week before the president took office for his second term, it asked people what should you can the policy for immigration on illegal immigrants? what was interesting, half, 53% of people said there should be a plan to allow people to become citizens of the u.s., 43% were actually favoring deportation and border security, but
at the rose law firm five years later. she kept working after her husband was elected governor of arkansas. she would become the first first lady to do so. >> i suppose i could have stayed home and baked cookies. >> then came washington. >> this health security card will represent a right of every citizen. and it will give each of us the security of knowing we will be taken care of when we need help. >> her health care initiative came crashing down in 1994. her high visibility came at a cost. but the super woman learned to steel herself in the face of repeated controversy. there was the unexplained suicide of vince foster, and questions about the clintons' whitewater land deal. but the questions did not end there. >> i did not have sexual relations with that woman. >> the impeachment threatened to derail team clinton. but hillary was nothing if not resilient. she was elected senator from new york with 56% of the vote. she became the first, first lady to enter congress. and in 2007, another first. >> when people tell me, well, you know, i don't think a woman can be elected president. i said
. it is a multifass ited effort. what brought me to this issue was meeting with a nurse soon after i had been elected to congress, about five years ago. she had been deployed several times. she had never been sexual assaulted but i asked her if it was as prevalent as i had heard. she said she was more afraid of her own soldiers than of the enemy. this culture change has to happen among the enlisted service members as well. as you talk about what you're doing and you're starting at the top, how do you change culture across the 80%? what are you doing at that level? how do you encourage everyone to embrace the efforts that you are currently engaged in? i fear that you don't and you are not successful there, we will come back again and again. you will tell us your good stories but we will continue to hear shocking situations that you have said will not occur again. >> thank you, congresswoman for giving me an opportunity to comment. i did not say this won't comment again. we will do everything we can to prevent it. we can't accept this. it is horrible, we all know that. human behavior, as you know, it i
top job being to make sure the president wasn't re-elected? >> you could look at it that way. if you asked the president he would say he believes these things. after his inaugural address rahm emanuel asked him where did that come from and why did you decide to give that speech with those points we talked about. the president said i decided to say things that i really believe in. he's a second-term president. he doesn't have to run for re-election. we can talk about these policies. president didn't do women in combat. he didn't lift a finger on climate change or push hard on immigration and gun control in his first term so he's a second-term president who doesn't have to face voters and these are things he wants to bring front and center. how much will he follow-up? we'll see. they do believe in the white house, look at the demographics of this country and now they're changing and the obama coalition from the last two elections, they believe if they can cement the loyalty of those voters in and part of that is acting on issues they most care about, these are issues that fit the obama
romney's 2014 campaign. scott walker, many of you remember that he survived a recall election over the summer. so quite the panel. thank you all for joining me the morning. do you sense since you are all more or less outside washington, that there is a split between how governors mayors, folks that have particular causes look at republicans in washington and how they look at the republican party? >> i think there's no doubt about it. i think there's a lot of pessimism unfortunately. but you get out around the country, bob and i like to make this point a lot. even though the president won a re-election in november, there are now 30 states across america that have republican governors. when you think about reform, welfare reform, tax reform, it happened at the state level and local level. while we need to change the climate here in washington. at the same time, i can look around this table and say you won, first governor ever to win a recalled bid, a recalled call. and you are in a very conservative state, in a conservative spot. you are in a conservative state, so you all were kind
" former speechwriter for president jimmy carter writes "now, well it's almost as if he has won re-election and knows he will never have to run again and hears the clock ticking on his last chance to use the power of the presidency on the causes he cares about." dan lothian joins us from the national cathedral where the national prayer service will begin in the next hour so the president's liberal town, i ne thinking it won't smooth things over with republicans. >> reporter: it could present a challenge for the president. some republicans looked at yesterday's remarks as a chance to essentially start over with a clean slate looking forward to the next four years, but there was sort of this criticism pushed back on the president's tone, you heard from senator john mccain saying that, quote, he would have like to have seen some outreach in the president's marks, senator john thune of south dakota calling it "mostly 30,000 foot stuff" he, referring to the president, "wasn't doing the kind of outreach he needs to do if he wants to get things accomplished in the second term" and senator susan co
: big election day today. voting is underway in israel for the country's next leader, current prime minister benjamin netanyahu voting today. expected to win re-election but with a smaller majority than in 2009. results are expected in this afternoon and we will have them for you live whether they happen. bill: in our country now the president setting up the next round of big budget battles. mr. obama defending the role of government in reaffirming support for major entitlement programs, the drivers of her debt like medicare, medicaid and social security, leaving many to wonder if any of d.c.'s spending will decrease. in fact democratic senator chuck schumer already suggesting that taxes may need to go up again to pay for all those bills and all that spending. stephen hayes, senior writer, "weekly standard", and fox news contributor has been on this. steve, good morning to you. how are you doing, post inauguration day? >> doing well. bill: give us a sense about what we can expect to happen in your town next. >> well, i think very little. you're looking at a spending, spending trend
a moment to sign a postcard, and we will make sure that they are delivered to the desks of your elected representatives. next, i have the great privilege and distinct honor of introducing the new president of nee march for life, jeanni monahan. she has worked to build a culture of life throughout the course of her professional career. that has included roles in the field of public policy, and both the government and in a think tank. if you ask her, she will tell you that she is excited and humbled to now be president of the organization that brings together people of all ages, of all faiths, and of all walks of life, for what has become the largest and most important civil rights protest in the world. [applause] please join me in welcoming the new president of the march for life, jeanne monahan. [applause] >> thank you. is anybody cold out there? [laughter] it is a little chilly, right? is ok. we are here for a pretty important cause, right? [applause]i can't. . hear you. [applause] today marks a somber moment in our country's history. we remember that 55 million americans have died as
was the last secretary of state to later be elected president. do you know it? james buchanan. he's actually the sixth secretary of state to become president. and that includes the first secretary of state, thomas jefferson. that was a tough one. thanks for playing along. >>> it has been a big political week from the inauguration to a deal on the debt ceiling to the president naming a new chief of staff. we wanted to focus on a few others that caught our attention. first, secretary of state hillary clinton on capitol hill. she was testifying about the attack in benghazi that left four americans dead. now at one point clinton angrily snapped at republican senator ron johnson who wanted to know why the exact origin of the attack should have been revealed much earlier. >> what difference at this point does it make? it is our job to figure out what happened and do everything to prevent to from happening again. >> joining me now, cnn contributor maria cardona and amy holmes, anchor of "real news" on "the blaze." maria, you used to work for hillary clinton. are you proud of your former boss? >> th
days ago and you are talking about elections four years from now. >> reporter: and the secretary side step. >> and i don't think, you know, either he or i can make predictions about what will happen tomorrow or the next year. >> reporter: clinton, who recently suffered a concussion and blood clot and is wearing glasses for double vision, answered a question about her health. >> it's great. it's great. i still have some lingering effects from falling on my head and having the blood clot, but doctors tell me that will all recede. thankfully i'm looking forward to being at full speed. >> reporter: soledad, this was not the only interview, at least for president obama, where we learned a little new about him. he sat down with the new republic and talked about politics here in washington, and also talked about gun violence and talked about football, and some of the injuries that we've seen from representative concussions. he says i'm a big football fan, but i have to tell you, if i had a son, i'd have to think long and hard before i would let him play football." soledad. >> thank you, bria
association, he's an elected republican leader, he's a minority who has felt this in his own skin and he's got the responsibility and the duty to tell other republicans we've got to shift course here. we've got to change the tone. we've got to change the message. we've got to change the way we talk. we cannot continue saying stupid things that antagonize whole blocks of voters. we can't continue talking about rape, we can't continue saying hostile things towards immigrants. >> there seems to be, well, there is a split in the republican party right now, so how many do you think, anna, are on jindal's side and how many are on the other? >> i think there's a lot more on jindal's side. i think there's a lot more on the rational right side than meets the eye. what happens, carol, there's really a handful of folks who say crazy things, who say offensive things, and the media narrative is that that is what defines the brand. that's not true. i was just at the republican house retreat and i felt comforted at the amount of very good, decent public servants that are there to do the right thing for the v
for re-election or be an elder statesperson of global stature and promote issues like women's rights and human rights. >> the way presidential elections work around here, she may need to decide in the next six weeks or so if she's running. that's the big question. will she run for president? what's your take on it? >> if you study, there is an industry of books about her. this is somebody who does not lack ambition. i think the ability to break the glass ceiling and be the first female president has to be overwhelming. she is the democratic party's favorite joyce. i think jill biden is probably poised for second choice. so, if she runs, it's going to be pretty hard to deny her in my view the nomination. so, the question is whether she's up for the exhaustion of going to the iowa caucus in new hampshire and south carolina and having lewinsky and other issues from the '90s come back and haunt her in some ways. does she have that fight in her? i think her health is a big determining factor, but she is still a power player and is very likely the frontrunner for the democratic nomination
days ago. >> right. >> and you're talking about elections four years from now. >> yeah. and i, as you know, steve, i am still secretary of state, so i'm out of politics, and i'm forbidden from even hearing these questions. >> boy. you know, they have -- if we ever decide to leave this hallowed ground, i think they have the chemistry together to maybe host "morning joe." >> all right. >> much the same chemistry. >> much the same chemistry. look at that. just crackling. come on, mika, that's force. >> that was forced, and that's what i was sort of uncomfortable with. it's sort of obvious. but i guess -- you know, i like them both very much. but is he doing this with everyone else? >> bing crosby and bob hope, they are not. i mean, come on. >> well, they didn't -- >> other people leaving the administration? >> this is more -- this is -- what's going on here, willie? >> they didn't break any new foreign policy ground, that was clear, in terms of the questioning. so then you're left to wonder what was going on there? what was the idea? although it was remarkable to see the two of them sitt
and tries to rebound from the election anesthesia have a lots to change. they didn't win the whus in november, they lost seats in the senate and while they kept control of the house, they lost a few seats there. as you mentioned, the republican national committee meeting over the last couple days and bobby jindal had very tough medicine for his fellow party people. take a listen. >> we've got to stop being the stupid party. and i'm serious. it's time for a new republican party that talks like adults. it's time for us to articulate our plans and visions for america in real terms. it's no secret we had a number of republicans that damaged the brand with offensive and bizarre comments. we've had enough of that. >> i think jindal may be talking about those republican senate candidates in missouri and indiana who are controversial comments about rape and abortion. they were expected to win their elections and did not. at the same time the chairman of the republican national committee, reince priebus is doing a big plan to figure out what went wrong in november in the elections. you kno
, with republicans here in washington, since his re-election, certainly the way he handled the fiscal cliff and i want to point to a clip of the president and his press conference earlier this week. take a look: >> president barack obama: they have suspicions about social security. they have suspicions about whether government should make sure that kids in poverty are getting enough to eat. >> chris: now we learn that the president is taking his campaign organization and transforming it into an issue advocacy group, organizing for action. is it fair to say that the president has given up on the inside game of negotiating here in washington and is much more interested in bringing outside pressure to bear on the people up on capitol hill. >> chris, you have to do both and i think that is a lesson from the first four years, you can't do one or the other. and i think we'll continue and, listen, the fiscal cliff deal you talked about, we have just about every republican senator who voted for this. we have cut taxes with the republicans and cut spending with the republicans and democrats, on evaluatbvi
that the president wasn't re-elected? >> well, i think part of it is. you could look at it that way. i'm sure if you asked the president he would say he believes these things. i'm actually told after his inaugural address, his former chief of staff, now chicago mayor, rahm emanuel asked him where did that come from and why did you decide to give that speech, again-w all those points we've talked about. and i'm told the president looked at him and said i just decided to say some things i really believe in. he's a second-term president. he doesn't have to run for re-election. we can talk about these policies. you know, the president didn't do these things. he didn't do women in combat. he didn't lift a finger on climate change. he didn't push hard on immigration. he didn't do gun control in his first term. so he's a second-term president who doesn't have to face the voters and these are things he wants to bring front and center. how much will he follow up? we will see. but they do believe in the white house, anderson, that pick up a demographics report, look at the demographics of this country and how
supported president obama in his re-election this year. so many hispanic americans came out for him. why do you that i happened? >> well, it's very easy. you know, obama and the democrats have the best option for the latinos. immigration reform is on the table. the dream act. so, you know, the latinos here in the united states are so powerful and their voice needs to be heard. they need to be treated as first class citizens. >> reporter: in addition to celebrities, campaign volunteers came from around the country. kelly jacobs traveled from mississippi, literally, wearing her support. how many sequins are on your dress? >> 4,000 total. >> reporter: and these are all done by hand? >> they're antique shield sequ n sequi sequins. >> reporter: a lot of work behind them and ahead if they are to help president obama deliver in the second term. but tonight, it was just time for a good party. >> it looks like a good party. brianna keilar, thank you. >> everyone talking about the jason wu dress. >> twice. >> twice in a row. all right. moving on to some other news. it is the testimony that many ameri
presidents who are lucky enough to get re-elected are often susceptible to what's called the second term curse. nixon had water-gate. clinton, monica. already days into his new term, barack obama has his first scandal, beyonce. congratulations are supposed to be a showcase of american democracy, the peaceful passage of power. >> so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. ♪ o say, can you see >> but what's everybody talki i about after president obama's big day? beyonce. she's still not saying whether she lip-synched the national anthem. ♪ brave >>> but what we do know for sure is there are others who absolutely should have. here now are scientifically compiled via google search top six worst ever national anthem renditions. number six, steven tyler. ♪ o say, can you see >> the lead singer of aerosmith viewed it to be a bad performance at last year's afc championship game. number five, carl lewis. through the perilous fight ♪ >> this one's a classic. he got booed in the m
was elected a vice president. there were three people in attendance and i cast the deciding vote. during my senior year of college, 9/11 occurred. that event changed my view of the world that this for many of us ensure. it also reaffirmed much of what i had already believe in that pushed me further to the right. it wasn't just the event itself that caused the reaction of the vessel anti-americanism on the campuses afterwards. as you would expect there was outraged for what the audience. except the outrage wasn't directed at the fanatics and he said restricted at the united states. restricted at us for supporting our country and a government that is at times forced to adopt costs and even conflicting policies in a complicated world. of all schools as much of the same. if you happen to be conservative and you ever want to increase your status as a minority conservative, you should hang out in cambridge massachusetts for a while. there is more anti-american is floating around in the red sox were the socks jersey's. it was in favor of the war in iraq and that was a pariah. while in law school a
is the iron hotter now than it was five, six years ago? >> reporter: the november election. it is as simple as that. republicans knew immediately when they saw the election results. not only that, the overall electorate was much more latino, 16%. but that mitt romney did worse than any republican candidate had done in three or four presidential elections. it was just terrible news for republicans. and they understood that. that is why lindsey graham, one of the republican senators who we will see momentarily placed a call to democrat chuck schumer and said let's get the ball rolling on this again. and i'm told that they had about five meetings, this group of bipartisan senators, six total, and they were -- now eight, too that came in and out. and they wanted to come up with this. and, yes, of course, we have seen this before, but i'm talking to sources on both sides, they say there is still a lot left undone, left on the table, but very, very sticky issues like with border security, like with the path to citizenship, but there definitely is a feeling they're closer now than they have been i
this as a leverage in wake of the election which hispanic and latino voters were favoring democrats, not so in the case of republicans. the g.o.p. recognizes they need to do something. democrats are saying they you will not play political football. >> we do not want immigration as a wedge issue. much rather we want a bipartisan bill that soxes the problem and becomes law. >> they put their marking on it today and the president will lay out his proposals. the senate majority leader, harry reid, before the news conference announcing the plan came out, said the so-called gang of eight proposal would be a major, major priority and will get it on the senate floor and pass it as soon as possible perhaps by spring. so a lot of momentum. we have not heard from the president and house republicans who control that side of the capitol who will have their say on border security and how to get there. it is always a major fight. >>shepard: thank you. the gang of eight is taking questions. that is when we find out the details. we will listen to the questions. here is john mccain. >> as i have stated befor
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 109 (some duplicates have been removed)